Interview Advice – For The Interviewer

Job interviews have traditionally been thought of as a one-sided affair, with the candidate having to jump through hoops for the interviewer.

It’s easy to find interview advice candidates on how to prepare, what to wear, protocol etc. However, an interview generally requires at least two people.

So what advice for the interviewer?

In an increasingly competitive market for companies looking to recruit, interviewers need to go through the same meticulous preparation in order to secure the best available candidates.

“The experience of a company as a candidate does not commence at employment – the experience starts at the first point of exposure.” – Kaylyn Jeffrey, HR Manager, Service.com.au

It’s a bit hackneyed but following the six Ps is a good place to start.

Preparation – if you’re asking candidates to research your company and the job profile, it is incumbent upon you to read the candidates CV/application form and find out more about them wherever possible. Fumbling through candidate details during the interviews shows ill preparation and lack of interest.

Punctuality – you’d expect no less from a candidate and judge them if they were late. Therefore, you must be punctual. They’ve come to you, there’s no excuse for dallying.

Presentation – candidates turns up in jeans and a t-shirt they’re a no. Interviewer turns up in jeans and a t-shirt, they’re a no. Simple.

Personality – as the interviewer you are the “face” of the organisation and can provide an insight into the company culture. Both sides of the table will be looking for a good fit. In short, be yourself!

Polite – if the candidate thinks the interviewer has been rude, expect that candidate to disappear into the ether. Enjoy having that vacancy constantly open.

Pen & paper – sounds obvious, is obvious.

Yes, candidates need to demonstrate they have the skills required perform the job and show interest in joining the company but why should they chose your company to work for next?

For the interviewer there can be a lot of distractions, tests, personality profiles, IQ scores, inside leg measurements.

I say keep it simple. How about just sitting down with someone, talk about the role, talk about the company, see if they have any questions and see which person best fit is?